geography

The Largest U.S. Cities Named After a Food : …and Other Mind-Boggling Geography Lists From Around the World

The Largest U.S. Cities Named After a Food : ...and Other Mind-Boggling Geography Lists From Around the World
Brandt Maxwell
November 2004
312
$16.95
How-To & Reference
9781891661471
6 x 9
Trade Paper

More than 500 astonishing lists and oddities fill this unusual compendium of geographic trivia. From a list of countries with the lowest number of international tourists per year to information about the largest countries in the world without an FM station, this book of wide-ranging curiosities makes minutia from across the world fascinating. What U.S. towns have the same name as a foreign country? Which large U.S. cities claim the highest percentage of households without telephone service? What state's residents call soft drinks "pop" more than any other? This humorous and revealing book holds these answers and many more.

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Read Excerpt
“Soda,” “Pop” or “Coke”?
An Internet survey was created by Alan McConchie to determine where people call soft drinks “soda” versus “pop” (as well as “coke”). Over 100,000 people filled out the Internet survey, which showed that, overall, people in the Northeast and parts of the Southwest were most likely to say “soda,” people in the Midwest and Northwest were most likely to say “pop” and people in the South were most likely to say “coke.” A sizable minority in the Boston area responded with “tonic.” Nationwide, “soda” drinkers just barely outnumbered “pop” drinkers (but in Canada, “pop” drinkers outnumbered “soda” drinkers by greater than a 20 to 1 ratio).

States with the Highest Percentage of Individuals Who Call Soft Drinks “Soda”
State Percentage of Individuals
Who Call Call Soft Drinks “Soda”
1. Rhode Island
2. New Jersey
3. Connecticut
4. Vermont
5. Maine
6. Hawaii
7. Delaware
8. New Hampshire
9. Maryland
10. California
95.0
94.6
94.4
93.6
92.4
90.9
90.3
82.5
78.2
74.0
States with the Highest Percentage of Individuals Who Call Soft Drinks “Pop”
State Percentage of Individuals
Who Call Call Soft Drinks “Pop”
1. Michigan
2. Iowa
2. Ohio
4. Minnesota
5. Nebraska
6. South Dakota
7. Montana
8. North Dakota
9. Washington
10. Wyoming
89.1
84.9
84.9
84.8
81.6
81.2
78.9
78.5
75.3
72.5
 

States with the Highest Percentage of Individuals Who Call Soft Drinks “Coke”

State Percentage of Individuals
Who Call Soft Drinks “Coke”
1. Alabama
2. Mississippi
3. Georgia
3. Tennessee
5. Arkansas
6. Texas
7. Louisiana
8. South Carolina
9. Kentucky
9. New Mexico
85.3
84.1
81.8
81.8
81.3
79.8
75.7
63.2
57.4
57.4
 

Most Populous U.S. Cities without an Interstate Highway

Most larger U.S. cities are served by the Interstate Highway system. The cities listed below have no Interstate Highways within the city limits (or within 10 miles), though all have at least one other highway which is built as a freeway.
1. Fresno, CA
2. Anchorage, AK *
3. Bakersfield, CA
4. Modesto, CA
5. Oxnard, CA
6. Salinas, CA *
7. Santa Rosa, CA
8. Brownsville, TX *
9. Lancaster, CA
10. Thousand Oaks, CA
* These are cities that one must reach by using a road which is (for at least part of the distance) not a freeway.
Countries Where the Highest Percentage
of Available Food Calories Comes From Sugar
The countries which rank highest produce (and consume) large amounts of sugar.
Country Percentage of Available Calories
from Sugar and Sweeteners
1. Cuba
2. Belize
3. Swaziland
4. Trinidad & Tobago
5. Costa Rica
6. Colombia
7. Brazil
8. Iceland
9. United States
10. Barbados
Includes calories from other sweeteners.
25.0
23.3
22.1
21.0
20.9
19.2
18.5
18.4
18.3
18.1
Off the Beaten Path (or No Path at All):
Countries with the Lowest Number
of International Tourists Per Year
Here is a “wish-list” for those who like to say “I’ve been to Rwanda, Bhutan and Tuvalu, among others. What are some of the countries you have been to?”
Country Number of Tourists Per Year
1. Kiribati
1. Tuvalu
3. Rwanda
4. Afghanistan
5. Sao Tome & Principe
5. Marshall Islands
7. Bhutan
8. Central African Republic
8. Sierra Leone
8. Somalia
1,000
1,000
2,000
4,000
5,000
5,000
7,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
Data were not available for Equatorial Guinea or Guinea-Bissau, two countries which would likely be on this list.
Author Information

Brandt Maxwell

The author of The Largest U.S. Cities Named After a Food . . . and Other Mind-Boggling Geography Lists is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. He has a B.S. and M.S. in Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Kansas. Maxwell has traveled extensively throughout the world, having visited more than 50 countries and 49 of the 50 U.S. states. This book is the result of his life-long passion for a variety of geographical topics. He lives in San Diego, California.

Reviews

“This quirky work will reel in geography aficionados and trivia buffs like nothing else. It reveals ordinary, extreme and surprising facts about places around the world, including their names, topography, transportation, idiosyncrasies, climates, demographics, finances, recreational pursuits and politics. . . . the facts he presents . . . fascinate.”
Publishers Weekly

“A compendium of the weird and the insightful, the funny and the serious.”
San Diego Union-Tribune

“If you’re into these odd facts, including a few hundred others, this book is for you.”
—Celebritycafe.com